A histologic assessment of the influence of low-intensity laser therapy on wound healing

Photomed Laser Surg. 2004 Jun;22(3):199-204.

A histologic assessment of the influence of low-intensity laser therapy on wound healing in steroid-treated animals.

Pessoa ES, Melhado RM, Theodoro LH, Garcia VG.

Dental School of Marilia, University of Marilia, Marilia, SP, Brazil.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of low-intensity laser therapy on the wound healing process treated with steroid. BACKGROUND DATA: Various biological effects have been associated with low-level laser therapy (LLLT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-eight rats were used, and after execution of a wound on the dorsal region of each animal, they were divided into 4 groups (n = 12), receiving the following treatments: G1 (control), wounds and animals received no treatment; G2, wounds were treated with LLLT; G3, animals received an intraperitoneal injection of steroid dosage (2 mg/kg of body weight); G4, animals received steroid and wounds were treated with LLLT. The laser emission device used was a GaAIAs (904 nm), in a contact mode, with 2.75 mW gated with 2.900 Hz during 120 sec (33 J/cm(2)). After the period of 3, 7, and 14 days, the animals were sacrificed and the parts sent to histological processing and dyed using hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and Masson trichromium (MT) techniques. RESULTS: The results have shown that the wounds treated with steroid had a delay in healing, while LLLT accelerated the wound healing process. Also, wounds treated with laser in the animals treated with steroid presented a differentiated healing process with a larger collagen deposition and also a decrease in both the inflammatory infiltrated and the delay on the wound healing process. CONCLUSION: LLLT accelerated healing, caused by the steroid, acting as a biostimulative coadjutant agent, balancing the undesirable effects of cortisone on the tissue healing process.
PMID: 15315726 [PubMed – in process]


Dr. Darryl Roundy

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